Curriculum Overview

A level Theory– Half Termly Schedule

Year Group Term Topic and Content
12

 

Red= Component 1 Scientific Principles of Physical Education

 

Blue= Component 2

Psychological and Social Principles of Physical Education

Autumn 1 Topic 1- Applied anatomy and physiology

Muscular Skeletal System:

–       Names of muscles and bones

–       Joints and movements

–       Agonist, prime mover, antagonist, fixator and Synergist

–       Movement analysis during physical activities

Biomechanics:

–       Newton’s law of motion

–       Centre of mass

–       Calculation of force

–       Response of muscular and skeletal systems to warm up

 

Skill acquisition

Coach and performer

–       Coaching styles to improve the performance of learners: command, reciprocal, guided discovery and problem solving

–       The development of tactics and strategies in a competition or performance to optimise outcome.

–       Dissection of a skill in order to identify technical elements: preparation, execution and recovery phases leading to the correct result or outcome

The classification and transfer of skills

–       Classification continuums as gross/fine, internally paced/externally paced, discrete/serial/continuous. The open/closed continuum in relation to the sporting environment, decision making and practice structure.

–       The uses of transfer of skills

 

Autumn 2 The Cardio-Respiratory system

–       Respiratory structures

–       Mechanics of breathing and the physiology of the respiratory system

–       The process of transport of respiratory gases

–       Lung Volume and capacities

–       Neural regulation of pulmonary ventilation

The Cardiovascular system

–       The structure of the heart

–       Cardiac responses to physical activity

 

 

Skill acquisition

Learning theories

–       The associative theories (classical and operant conditioning). Reinforcement – positive, negative, punishment, stimulus– response (S-R) bond – and its use in skill learning

–       Thorndike’s three laws in relation to learning as effect, exercise and readiness and their application to practical situations.

–       Fitts and Posner’s three stages of learning (cognitive, associative and autonomous)

Practices

–       Knowledge and understanding of practice methods and structure as a coach and for a performer and their impact on performance

–       Practice methods as part, progressive part, whole, whole-partwhole. Practice structure as in massed, distributed, fixed and variable

–       The role and effectiveness of mental practice and how it can enhance performance

 

Spring 1 The Cardiovascular system

–       Regulation of heart rate

–       Vascular responses to physical activity

–       Transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide by the vascular system

–       Long term Reponses of the cardiovascular system due to exercise

–       Response of cardio-respiratory and cardiovascular systems to warm-up

–       An unhealthy lifestyle’s effect on the cardiovascular and cardio-respiratory systems

–       Sedentary lifestyles

 

 

Skill acquisition

Guidance

–       The types, purpose and effectiveness of guidance methods: visual, verbal, manual and mechanical

–       Uses of technology to underpin guidance methods in order to optimise performance

Feedback

–       The types, purposes and effectiveness of feedback as motivation, reinforcement Types of feedback as in positive/negative, knowledge of performance, knowledge of results, concurrent/terminal, intrinsic/extrinsic and detection and correction of errors

–       Uses of technology to support types of feedback in order to optimise performance.

–       Open and closed loop control

Memory models

–       Information processing

–       The three memory systems as short-term sensory store (STSS), short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM)

–       Link between STSS, STM and LTM in terms of retrieval and rehearsal and how this affects output

–       Measuring reaction and response times using appropriate technology.

–       Understanding that schema theory is an organised package of information stored in LTM that updates and modifies motor programmes

Spring 2 Neuromuscular system:

–       Muscle fibre types

–       The anatomy of the neuromuscular system

–       Muscle fibre types and physiology

–       Acute response of the neuromuscular system to exercise

–       Chronic response of muscle cells produced by exercise

Topic 2: Exercise physiology and applied movement analysis

Diet and Nutrition

–       Nutrition and weight management

–       The need for a balance diet

–       Hydration and electrolyte balance

 

 

 

Skill acquisition

Memory models

–       Information processing

–       The three memory systems as short-term sensory store (STSS), short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM)

–       Link between STSS, STM and LTM in terms of retrieval and rehearsal and how this affects output

–       Measuring reaction and response times using appropriate technology.

–       Understanding that schema theory is an organised package of information stored in LTM that updates and modifies motor programmes

Summer 1 –       The role and use of supplementation

–       Strategies for optimising food/ fuel intake

Preparation and Training Methods

–       Fitness tests and their results

–       Fitness testing and the reasons for testing

–       Principles of maximal and submaximal tests

–       Components of fitness

 

 

 

Sport psychology

Factors that can influence an individual in physical activities

–       Personality theories Trait (Innate) theory – (Eysenck, Cattell’s 16 Personality Factors) Interactionist theory Behaviour, Hollander’s and Martens personality structure

–       Wood’s Triadic Model, Understanding how attitudes are formed and shape behaviour,   Changing attitudes

–       Arousal and its effect on performance

–       Anxiety and its effect on performance. The three dimensions of anxiety: cognitive, somatic and behavioural. Types of anxiety, state and trait anxiety

–       Aggression v. Assertion

–       Types of motivation – self-motivation characteristics, positive, negative, intrinsic and extrinsic, link to rewards – internal/external, tangible/intangible

–       Theories of motivation Achievement Motivation Theory, NAF, NACH

–       social facilitation, including positive and negative influences and social inhibition.

Summer 2 Principles and Methods of Training

–       Principles of training

–       Measuring and calculating working intensity

–       Contemporary technologies used to monitor fitness and performance

–       Periodisation

–       Methods of training linked to activities

–       Preparation for altitude, heat and humidity

–       Speeding recovery

 

 

Personal Development Plan: Coursework to complete during summer term and six weeks holiday

 

 

Sport psychology

Dynamics of a group/team and how they can influence the performance of an individual and/or team.

–       Characteristics of a successful team

–       Theories Carron: the four factors that affect formation and development of a cohesive group/team – environmental, personal, leadership and team factors.   Steiner: actual productivity = group productivity – losses due to faulty processes

–       Social loafing

–       Ringlemann effect

 

Goal setting

–       Knowledge and understanding of SMART(ER) targets (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound, evaluated and recorded)

13

 

 

 

Red= Component 1 Scientific Principles of Physical Education

 

Blue= Component 2

Psychological and Social Principles of Physical Education

Autumn 1 Injury prevention and the rehabilitation of injury

–       Knowledge and understanding of the different classifications of common sporting injuries

–       Acute injuries: cruciate ligament injury; soft tissue damage, sprain, Achilles tendon injury, fracture, dislocation

–       Overuse injuries: strain, shin splints (periostitis), tendonitis (including tennis elbow and golfer’s elbow), stress fractures

–       Prevention of injuries Conditioning, muscle balance, technique, protective equipment, managing risks

–       Rehabilitation from injuries

 

 

 

Sport psychology

Attribution theory

–       Weiner’s attribution theory and the four attributions: ability, effort, luck, task difficulty

–       The three main dimensions of attribution: locus of causality, locus of stability and locus of controllability

–       Confidence and self-efficacy

–       Knowledge and understanding of Vealey’s model of sport specific confidence

–       Knowledge and understanding of self-confidence and the self-concept (Humanist)

Leadership

–       The different types of leadership styles: autocratic, laissez-faire and democratic based on the models of Fiedler and Chelladuri

Autumn 2 Linear motion

–       Knowledge and understanding of the factors associated with linear motion and the application of definitions, equations, calculations and units of measurement in a sporting context

–       Calculation of the distance and displacement, speed and average speed, velocity and acceleration.

–       Plot, label and interpret graphs of motion.

Angular motion

–       Knowledge and understanding of how angular motion is applied in a sporting context

–       Factors affecting moment of inertia: mass and distribution of mass from axis of rotation.

–       Effects of increasing or decreasing the moment of inertia when rotating about an axes

–       Conservation of angular momentum during flight, moment of inertia and its relationship with angular velocity

 

Sport and society

The factors leading to the emergence and development of modern day sport

–       The historical and social context in which mob activities (for the peasants) and popular recreations (for the aristocracy) existed in pre-industrial Britain.

–       View taken by the landowners, aristocracy, church and peasants on recreational activities and reasoning behind the view

–       The effect of the Industrial Revolution on British society and how it was reflected in recreational activities

–       The socio-cultural factors that influenced the rationalisation of sport in the post-industrial era: the roles of public schools and the Oxbridge melting pot

–       Thomas Arnold and the influence of the Clarendon Commission; government legislation; the development of factory teams; the growth of the sporting press; establishment of the early national governing bodies (NGBs)

–       The emergence of competing for corporations rather than geographically-based teams

Spring 1 Projectile motion

–       Forces acting during flight that affect projectile motion: gravity, air resistance and lift forces.

–       Factors that determine the horizontal displacement of a projectile: velocity of release, height of release, angle of release.

–       Technique modification through the application of technology by the performer and coach in order to improve performance.

Fluid Mechanics

–       Knowledge, understanding and application of aerodynamics and hydrodynamics to appropriate sports contexts.

–       Factors affecting fluid friction and air resistance: velocity, drag force, mass, streamlining and surface characteristics of body.

–       Interaction of lift forces with objects: upward and downward lift forces, angle of attack and the Bernoulli effect.

–       Types of spin: topspin, backspin, sidespin. Magnus effect and how they impact on flight path and bounce

–       Principles of fluid mechanics and how it has influenced technological advancements in technique modification, clothing/suits, equipment/apparatus.

 

 

 

Sport and society

The factors leading to the emergence and development of modern day sport

–       Equality and diversity of disability and gender with specific reference to the ParaSport movement and improved opportunities for women in global sport

–       Migration patterns of sporting labour and the impact on domestic competitions and national teams

Globalisation of sport

–       Colonial diffusion across the British Empire and the globe and how this led to the creation and later the development of international sport and increased globalisation

–       The creation, development and impact of national and international governing bodies on sport and society

–       The ideals, context and impact of the modern Olympic Games and other international sporting competitions, e.g. European Championships, Commonwealth Games

Commercialisation of sport

–           understanding of the concept of commercialisation and commodities. Comparisons between advertising, sponsorship, endorsement and merchandising

–           The historical and social context of commercialisation: broken time payments; spectatorism; developments in the media.

–           The events of the 1968, 1972 and the 1976 Olympics and their impact on the 1984 games in Los Angeles. The blueprint for the commercialisation of future sport created by Peter Ueberroth at the 1984 Games

–           Franchises in sport (USA and UK), the power shift from the governing bodies to the media, the concept of the ‘golden triangle’

Spring 2 Sport and society

Ethics and deviance in sport

–       The pressures on sports performers and spectators to behave in a deviant way

–       The impact of commercialisation on the sportsmanship ethic and the growth of gamesmanship in the UK

–       Deviance in sport: use of performance enhancing drugs, (early conception of drug use up to the modern day)

–       Different responses of national and international governing bodies, governments and the law to combat deviance in sport, including the utilisation of technology

–       WADA

The relationship between sport and the media

–       The development of media coverage from print to televised events and its role in sport. Reasons for the growth of live media/social media coverage and its implications for performers, supporters and the sport

–       The advantages and disadvantages of the development of specific sports media packages and the growth of ‘pay per view’.

Development routes from talent identification through to elite performance

–       understanding of development routes from talent identification through to elite performance

–       Traditional and contemporary systems of the identification and development of talent in the UK with specific reference to the approaches of former East Germany and Australia

Participation and health of the nation

–       barriers to participation, the benefits of mass participation and the impact of wearable technology on participation

–       Concept of mass participation and initiatives/programmes to promote community participation in the UK

–       Participation trends in the UK in the 21st century

 

A-Level Psychology – Half Termly Schedule

Year Group Term Topic and Content
12 Autumn 1 Approaches in Psychology

–       Origins of psychology and the work of Wilhem Wundt (introspection)

–       Learning approaches (including behaviourism and social learning theory)

–       Cognitive approach (including the emergence of cognitive neuroscience)

–       Biological approach

–       Psychodynamic approach

–       Humanistic approach

–       Comparison of approaches

 

Autumn 2 Memory

–       The multi-store model of memory and the features of each store (coding, capacity and duration)

–       Types of long-term memory: episodic, semantic, procedural

–       The working memory model

–       Explanations for forgetting: proactive and retroactive interference and retrieval failure due to absence of cues

–       Factors affecting the accuracy of eyewitness testimony: misleading information, (including leading questions and post-event discussion) and anxiety

–       Improving the accuracy of eyewitness testimony including the use of the cognitive interview

 

Research Methods

–       Experimental method

–       Control of variables and standardised procedure

–       Pilot studies

–       Experimental design

–       Sampling methods

–       Types of experiments (laboratory, field, natural and quasi)

–       Interviews

–       Questionnaires

–       Observation studies

–       Ethical considerations

Spring 1 Research Methods (Continued)

–       Correlations

–       Descriptive statistics and graph work

–       The sign test (statistical testing)

–       Peer review

–       Psychology and the economy

 

Attachment

–       Caregiver-infant interactions in humans (reciprocity and interactional synchrony)

–       Schaffer’s stages of attachment

–       Multiple attachments and the role of the father

–       Animal studies of attachment: Lorenz and Harlow

–       Explanations of attachment: learning theory and Bowlby’s monotropic theory

–       Ainsworth’s Strange Situation

–       Cultural variations in attachment, including van Ijzendoorn.

–       Bowlby’s theory of maternal deprivation

–       Romanian orphan studies: effects of institutionalisation

–       The influence of early attachment on childhood and adult relationships

 

Spring 2 Social Influence

–       Types of conformity and explanations of conformity

–       Informational social influence and normative social influence, and variables affecting conformity

–       Asch’s study of conformity

–       Conformity to social roles (Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison experiment)

–       Explanations for obedience and factors affection obedience (social and dispositional)

–       Milgram’s study of obedience

–       Explanations of resistance to social influence (including social support and locus of control)

–       Minority influence

–       Social change

 

Summer 1 Psychopathology

–       Definitions of abnormality, including deviation from social norms, failure to function adequately, statistical infrequency and deviation from ideal mental health

–       The behavioural, emotional and cognitive characteristics of phobias, depression and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)

–       The behavioural approach to explaining and treating phobias

–       The cognitive approach to explaining and treating depression

–       The biological approach to explaining and treating OCD

 

Summer 2 Biopsychology

–       The divisions of the nervous system

–       The structure and function of neurons

–       The process of synaptic transmission

–       The function of the endocrine system

–       The fight or flight response including the role of adrenaline

–       Localisation of function in the brain and hemispheric lateralisation (including Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas)

–       Plasticity and functional recovery of the brain after trauma

–       Split brain research (Sperry)

–       Ways of studying the brain (scanning techniques)

–       Biological rhythms: circadian, infradian and ultradian and the difference between these rhythms

–       The effect of endogenous pacemakers and exogenous zeitgebers on the sleep/wake cycle

13 Autumn 1 Issues and Debates

–       Gender bias

–       Culture bias

–       Free will and determinism

–       The nature-nurture debate including the interactionist approach

–       Holism and reductionism

–       Idiographic and nomothetic approaches to psychological investigation

–       Ethical implications of research studies and theory, including reference to social sensitivity

 

Research Methods (Year 2)

–       Content analysis

–       Case studies

–       Reliability and ways of assessing reliability

–       Types of validity and assessment of validity

–       Features of science

–       Reporting psychological investigations

–       Inferential statistics

 

Autumn 2 Gender

–       The difference between sex and gender

–       Sex-role stereotypes

–       Androgyny and measuring androgyny including the Bem Sex Role Inventory

–       The role of chromosomes and hormones (testosterone, oestrogen and oxytocin) in sex and gender

–       Atypical sex chromosome patterns: Klinefelter’s syndrome and Turner’s syndrome

–       Cognitive explanations of gender development (Kohlberg’s theory and Gender schema theory)

–       Psychodynamic explanation of gender development

–       Social learning theory as applied to gender development

–       The influence of culture and media on gender roles

–       Biological and social explanations of Gender Identity Disorder (GID)

 

Spring 1 Stress

–       The physiology of stress, including general adaptation syndrome, the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal system, the sympathomedullary pathway and the role of cortisol

–       The role of stress in illness (immunosuppression and cardiovascular disorders)

–       Sources of stress: life changes and daily hassles

–       Workplace stress

–       Measuring stress

–       Individual differences in stress: personality types and hardiness

–       Managing and coping with stress: drug therapy, stress inoculation therapy and biofeedback

–       Gender differences in coping with stress

–       The role of social support in coping with stress

 

Spring 2 Forensic Psychology

–       Problems in defining crime

–       Ways of measuring crime

–       Offender profiling: the top-down approach and bottom-up approach

–       Biological explanations of offending behaviour (atavistic form, genetics and neural)

–       Psychological explanations of offending behaviour (Eysenck’s theory of the criminal personality)

–       Cognitive explanations (level of moral reasoning and cognitive distortions and differential association theory)

–       Psychodynamic explanations

–       Dealing with offending behaviour (recidivism, behaviour modification in custody, anger management and restorative justice programmes)

 

 

At HFUTC we currently follow the AQA Sociology A level syllabus (7192). This is divided into three core areas of study:

  • Education with Theory and Methods (2 hours)
  • Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods (2 hours)
  • Topics in Sociology – within this unit students will study Families and Households and Beliefs in Society (2 hours)

Each component is worth 33.3% of the exam and is examined by a written paper lasting 2 hours.

Students will study a range of sociological theories including: Functionalism, Marxism, Feminism, the New Right and Interpretivism and they will be expected to apply and evaluate these theories in context. They will explore the impact of social policy on both the individual and wider society and understand how different institutions interact with each other. Students will also examine the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of types of methodological tools and how they may be used to research issues in society.

The course is divided into 4 distinct areas of study, with theory and method running throughout the course over the two years.

Year 12 Family and households

Role and function of the family,

Growth of family diversity,

Domestic labour debate,

Social construction of childhood,

Demographic change.

Education with Theory and Methods

Role and function of education,

Education and social policy,

Teacher labelling and school subcultures,

Achievement among different social groups.

Year 13 Beliefs in society

Role and function of religion,

Religious organisations,

Secularisation and Fundamentalism,

Religion attendance and social groups.

Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods

Role and function of crime and deviance,

Crime and Subcultures,

Media portrayal of crime,

Growth in global and green crime,

Punishment systems.

 

English Curriculum Overview

Year 10

English Literature English Language
Half Term 1 A Christmas Carol Paper 1 Skills – Comprehension and language analysis
Half Term 2 A Christmas Carol Paper 1 Skills – Structure and evaluation
Half Term 3 A Christmas Carol/Romeo and Juliet Paper 1 Skills – Creative writing (descriptions)
Half Term 4 Romeo and Juliet Paper 1 Skills – Creative writing (narrative)
Half Term 5 Romeo and Juliet Paper 1 Skills – exam practice
Half Term 6 Unseen Poetry Paper 1 Skills – exam practice

 

Year 11

English Literature English Language
Half Term 1 An Inspector Calls Paper 2 Skills – Synthesis and Language Analysis
Half Term 2 An Inspector Calls Paper 2 Skills – Comparison
Half Term 3 Power and Conflict Poetry Paper 2 Skills – Writing for Different Purposes
Half Term 4 Power and Conflict Poetry Revision and exam practice
Half Term 5 All Literature Revision Revision and exam practice
Half Term 6 GCSE Exams GCSE Exams

 

Year 12

Teacher 1 Teacher 2
Half Term 1 The Great Gatsby The Taming of the Shrew
Half Term 2 The Great Gatsby The Taming of the Shrew
Half Term 3 Pre 1900 Poetry The Taming of the Shrew
Half Term 4 Pre 1900 Poetry Non Exam Assessment
Half Term 5 Unseen Poetry Non Exam Assessment
Half Term 6 Unseen Poetry Non Exam Assessment

 

Year 13

Teacher 1 Teacher 2
Half Term 1 A Streetcar Named Desire The Help
Half Term 2 A Streetcar Named Desire The Help
Half Term 3 Unseen Prose Feminine Gospels
Half Term 4 Unseen Prose Feminine Gospels
Half Term 5 Revision Revision
Half Term 6 A Level Exams A Level Exams

GCSE Business – Half Termly Schedule

Students follow the EdExcel GCSE (9-1) Business course.

Reference numbers next to the topics covered refer to the relevant section of the syllabus.

Year Group Term Topic and Content
10 Autumn 1 Topic 1.1 Enterprise and entrepreneurship

 

–       1.1.1 – The Dynamic Nature of Business

–       1.1.2 – Risk and Reward

–       1.1.3 – The role of business enterprise

Topic 1.2 Spotting a business opportunity

–       1.2.1 – Customer needs

–       1.2.2 – Market research

 

Autumn 2 Topic 1.2 Spotting a business opportunity

 

–       1.2.3 Market segmentation

–       1.2.4 The competitive environment

 

Topic 1.3 Putting a business idea into practice

–       1.3.1 Business aims and objectives

–       1.3.2 Business revenues, costs and profits

 

Spring 1 Topic 1.3 Putting a business idea into practice

 

–       1.3.3 Cash and cash-flow

–       1.3.4 Sources of business finance

 

Topic 1.4 Making the business effective

–       1.4.1 The options for start-up and small businesses

–       1.4.2 Business location – Factors influencing business location

 

 

Spring 2 Topic 1.4 Making the business effective

–       1.4.3 The marketing mix

–       1.4.4 Business plans

–       1.4.4 – The purpose of planning business activity

 

Topic 1.5 Understanding external influences on business

–       1.5.1 Business stakeholders

 

Summer 1 Topic 1.5 Understanding external influences on business

–       1.5.2 Technology and business

–       1.5.3 Legislation and business

–       1.5.4 The economy and business

–       1.5.5 External influences

Summer 2 Theme 2: Building a business

 

Topic 2.1 Growing the business

–       2.1.1 Business growth

–       2.1.2 Changes in business aims and objectives

–       2.1.3 Business and globalisation

 

 

 

11 Autumn 1 Topic 2.1 Growing the business

–       2.1.4 Ethics, the environment and business

 

Topic 2.2 Making marketing decisions

–       2.2.1 Product

–       2.2.2 Price

 

Autumn 2 Topic 2.2 Making marketing decisions

–       2.2.3 Promotion

–       2.2.4 Place

–       2.2.5 Using the marketing mix to make business decisions

 

Topic 2.3 Making operational decisions

–       2.3.1 Business operations

–       2.3.2 Working with suppliers

–       2.3.3 Managing quality

–       2.3.4 The sales process

 

Spring 1 Topic 2.4 Making financial decisions

–       2.4.1 Business calculations

–       2.4.2 Understanding business performance

 

Topic 2.5 Making human resource decisions

 

–       2.5.1 Organisational structures

 

Spring 2  

Topic 2.5 Making human resource decisions

 

–       2.5.2 Effective recruitment

–       2.5.3 Effective training and development

–       2.5.4 Motivation

 

GCSE Computer Science – Half Termly Schedule

Students follow the EdExcel GCSE (9-1) Computer Science course.

Reference numbers next to the topics covered refer to the relevant section of the syllabus.

Year Group Term Topic and Content
10 Autumn 1 Topic 1: Problem solving

 

–       1.1 Algorithms

–       1.2 Decomposition and abstraction

 

Topic 2: Programming

–       2.1 Develop code

–       2.2 Constructs

 

Autumn 2 Topic 2: Programming

 

–       2.3 Data types and Structures

–       2.4 Input/output

–       2.5 Operators

–       2.6 Subprograms

 

 

Spring 1 Topic 3: Data

 

–       3.1 Binary

–       3.2 Data representation

–       3.3 Data storage and compression

 

 

 

Spring 2 Topic 3: Data

 

–       3.4 Encryption

–       3.5 Databases

 

Summer 1 Topic 4: Computers

 

–       4.1 Machines and computational modelling

–       4.2 Hardware

–       4.3 Logic

 

 

Summer 2 Topic 4: Computers

 

–       4.4 Software

–       4.5 Programming languages

 

 

 

11 Autumn 1 Topic 5: Communication and the internet

 

–       5.1 Networks

–       5.2 Network security

 

Autumn 2 Topic 5: Communication and the internet

 

–       5.3 The internet and the world wide web

 

Spring 1 Topic 6: The bigger picture

 

–       6.1 Emerging trends, issues and impact

 

Spring 2  

Non-Exam Assessment

 

 

GCSE Physical Education Theory– Half Termly Schedule

Year Group Term Topic and Content
10 Autumn 1 –       The relationship between Health & Fitness

–       Defining health, fitness and exercise and the relationship between them

–       Components of fitness

–       Fitness testing

–       Principles of training.

–       Principles of training – FITT, Individual needs, Specificity, Progressive Overload, Rest & Recovery, Reversibility, thresholds of training & Karvonen Formula.

–       Methods of training, Continuous, Fartlek, Interval, Weight, Cross, Circuit, Plyometric

Autumn 2 –       How to optimise training and prevent injury

–       PARQ

–       Injury prevention

–       Sporting and overuse injuries

–       RICE

–       Performance enhancing drugs

–       Recreational drugs

–       Effective use of warm up and cool down

–       Purpose of warm up & cool down

–       Phases of a warm up

–       Activities included in a warm up & cool down.

–       Mental Preparation for performance.

–       Importance of mentally preparing for performances

Spring 1 –       Physical, Emotional and Social Health.

–       Physical health

–       Emotional Health

–       Social Health

–       Impacts of fitness on wellbeing

–       Lifestyle choices

–       Positive and negative effects of lifestyle choices.

–       The consequences of a sedentary lifestyle.

–       Sedentary lifestyle

–       Weight related conditions, Obese, Overfat, Overweight

Spring 2 –       Energy Use, Diet, Nutrition & Hydration.

–       Nutritional requirements

–       Macro nutrients and their roles

–       Micro nutrients and their roles

–       Factors affecting optimum weight

–       Energy balancing

–       Importance of hydration

Summer 1 –       The use of Goal setting and Smart targets to improve and/or optimise performance.

–       Use of goal setting

–       Principles of SMART targets

–       Setting and reviewing targets

–       Use of data

–       Data analysis

–       Data collection

–       Qualitative and quantitative

–       Presenting data

Summer 2 –       Engagement patterns of different social groups in physical activity and sport.

–       Participation rates in physical activity

–       Gender, Age, Socio-economic group, Ethnicity, Disability

–       Data analysis.

–       Commercialisation of Physical Activity and Sport.

–       The relationship between Commercialisation and the media

–       Advantages and disadvantages of commercialisation

–       Roles in sport

–       Ethical and sociocultural issues in physical activity and sport.

–       Sportsmanship

–       Gamesmanship

–       Deviance

11 Autumn 1 –       Personal Exercise Program

–       Coursework 10% (20 marks)

–       Design a training programme to improve/optimise performance of chosen activity

–       Use of SMART targets, use of methods of training, use of principles of training, evaluation of programme.

–       Anaerobic and aerobic exercise

–       Use of glucose and oxygen to release energy

–       Energy sources

Autumn 2 –       Structure and functions of the cardio respiratory system

–       Functions of the cardiovascular system

–       Structure of the cardiovascular system

–       Structure of arteries, capillaries and veins and the roles played within the body

–       Vasoconstriction, vasodilatation and vascular shunting

–       Importance of red and white blood cells

–       Vital capacity and tidal volume

–       Location of main components of respiratory system- lungs, bronchi, bronchioles, alveoli, diaphragm.

–       Structure of alveoli

–       How the cardio respiratory system works together.

–       Planes and Axis of movement.

–       Movement patterns using body planes

–       Sagittal, frontal and transverse planes

–       Frontal, sagittal, vertical axis

–       Movement about planes and axis in summersault, cartwheel and full twist jump.

Spring 1 –       Structure and functions of the musculoskeletal system

–       Functions of the skeleton

–       Classification of bones

–       Structure of bones

–       Classification of joints

–       Roles of ligaments and tendons

–       Muscle types

–       Locations of muscles within the body and their roles

–       Antagonistic pairs of muscles

–       Muscle fibres

–       How the musculoskeletal system works together.

–       Short and long term effects of exercise.

–       Muscle fatigue, lactate accumulation

–       Effect on cardiac output, stroke volume, heart rate

–       How the cardiorespiratory work to recover from physical activity.

–       Long term effects of aerobic and anaerobic training

–       Benefits to musculoskeletal and cardio respiratory systems

Spring 2 –       Lever systems

–       First, second and third class levers

–       Mechanical advantages and disadvantages

–       Classification of skills

–       Open-closed, basic (simple)- complex, low organisation & high organisation

–       Practice structures fixed variable, massed, distributed

–       Practices to develop range of skills

–       Guidance and feedback on performance.

–       Types of guidance- visual, verbal, manual & mechanical

–       Advantages and disadvantages of each guidance type

–       Types of feedback- intrinsic, extrinsic, concurrent & terminal

 

GCSE Psychology – Half Termly Schedule

Year Group Term Topic and Content
10 Autumn 1 Skills in Psychology (Introductory Psychology)

–       What is Psychology?

–       Developing key skills (description, application and evaluation)

–       Nature and nurture

–       Revision strategies in Psychology

 

Memory

–       Processes of memory: encoding (input) storage and retrieval (output)

–       How memories are encoded and stored (Baddeley’s study)

–       Different types of memory: episodic, semantic and procedural memory

–       The multi-store model of memory: sensory, short term and long term

–       Features of each store: coding, capacity, duration

 

Autumn 2 Memory (Continued)

–       Primacy and recency effects in recall: the effects of serial position

–       Murdock’s serial position curve study

–       The theory of reconstructive memory

–       Bartlett’s War of the Ghosts study

–       Factors affecting the accuracy of memory, including interference, context and false memories

 

Spring 1 Research Methods

–       Experimental method

–       Control of variables and standardised procedure

–       Experimental design

–       Sampling methods

–       Types of experiments (laboratory, field and natural)

–       Interviews

–       Questionnaires

–       Case studies

–       Observation studies

–       Correlations

–       Ethical considerations

–       Descriptive statistics and graph work

 

Spring 2 Development

–       Early brain development

–       The roles of nature and nurture in development

–       Piaget’s theory of cognitive development

–       The four stages of development: sensorimotor, pre-operational, concrete operational and formal operational

–       Application of Piaget’s theory to education

–       McGarrigle and Donaldson’s ‘naughty teddy study’

–       Hughes’ ‘policeman doll study’

–       Dweck’s mindset theory of learning

–       Willingham’s Learning Theory

 

Summer 1 Perception

–       The difference between sensation and perception

–       Monocular depth cues

–       Binocular depth cues

–       Gibson’s direct theory of perception (the influence of nature)

–       Visual illusions and examples of visual illusions

–       Gregory’s constructivist theory of perception (the influence of nurture)

–       Factors affecting perception (culture, motivation, emotion and expectation)

–       Gilchrist and Nesberg’s study of motivation

–       Bruner and Minturn’s study of perceptual set

 

Summer 2 Social Influence

–       What is conformity and factors which affect it (social and dispositional)

–       Asch’s study of conformity

–       Milgram’s agency theory and factors which affect obedience (social and dispositional)

–       Adorno’s authoritarian personality

–       What is bystander behaviour and factors which affect it (social and dispositional)

–       Piliavin’s subway study

–       Prosocial/antisocial behaviour and factors which affect it (social and dispositional)

 

11 Autumn 1 Language, Thought and Communication

–       Piaget’s theory: language depends on thought

–       The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis: thinking depends on language

–       The effect of language and our thought of the view of the world

–       Differences between human and animal communication

–       Von Frisch’s bee study

–       Definitions of non-verbal communication and verbal communication

–       Functions of eye contact

–       Body language

–       Personal space

–       Explanations of non-verbal behaviour (including Darwin’s evolutionary theory and evidence that non-verbal behaviour is learned)

–       Yuki’s study of emoticons

 

Autumn 2 Brain and Neuropsychology

–       Structure and function of the nervous system

–       The James-Lange theory of emotion

–       Neuron structure and function

–       Hebb’s theory of learning and neuronal growth

–       Structure and function of the brain including localisation of brain function

–       Penfield’s study of the interpretive cortex

 

Spring 1 Brain and Neuropsychology (Continued)

–       Cognitive neuroscience: how the structure and function of the brain relate to behaviour and cognition

–       The use of scanning techniques to identify brain functioning: CT, PET and fMRI scans

–       Tulving’s ‘gold’ memory study

–       How neurological damage e.g. stroke or injury can affect motor abilities and behaviour

 

Psychological Problems

–       Characteristics of mental health (positive engagement with society, effective coping with challenges)

–       Cultural variations in beliefs about mental health problems

–       Increased challenges of modern living

–       Increased recognition of the nature of mental health problems and lessening of social stigma

–       Effects of significant mental health problems on individuals and society (including individual effects and social effects)

 

Spring 2 Psychological Problems (Continued)

 

–       Characteristics of clinical depression

–       Theories of depression including biological and psychological explanations

–       Interventions/therapies for depression including anti-depressants and CBT

–       Wiles’ study of the effectiveness of CBT

–       Characteristics of addiction

–       Theories of addiction including biological and psychological explanations

–       Interventions/therapies for addiction including aversion therapy and self-management programmes

 

 

At HFUTC all Key Stage 4 students will follow and be entered for a full course GCSE in Religious Studies. Currently students are following the AQA Religious Studies A (8062) syllabus. This is divided into two core areas of study:

  • The study of religion: Beliefs, teachings and practices (1 hour 45 mins)
  • Thematic Studies: Religious, ethical and philosophical issues. (1 hour 45 mins)

Each component is worth 50% of the exam and is examined by one written paper lasting 1 hour and 45 minutes. At HFUTC our chosen areas of specialism are Christianity and Islam and students will learn a variety of religious beliefs and practices from these two religions and how they are applied to a range of ethical and philosophical issues. In paper 2 students are also able to apply their own religious beliefs/non beliefs to the issues. The two year course is divided up into five distinct areas of study with religious beliefs being taught throughout the whole course.

Autumn Term Spring term Summer Term
Year 10 Religion and life issues.

·         Abortion

·         Euthanasia

·         Animal rights

·         Environment

Religion, human rights and social injustice.

·         Prejudice and discrimination

·         Human Rights

·         Attitudes to Wealth

·         Poverty

Religious practices

This unit explores a range of religious practices inside both religions, for example: fasting, pilgrimage, types of worship and support for the community.

Year 11 Relationships and families.

·         Marriage

·         Divorce

·         Sexual relationships

·         Contraception

Religion, crime and punishment.

·         Good and Evil

·         Causes of crime

·         Punishment systems

·         Forgiveness and Reconciliation

Examination Period

 

The ethical and philosophical modules may change in accordance with the learning needs of the students or the college but have been chosen where possible to support the focus on health care.

Within RS students are assessed regularly in line with HFUTC assessment and data policies and all assessments are graded for Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar.

GCSE Sociology – Half Termly Schedule

Year Group Term Topic and Content
10 Autumn 1 Studying Society (Introductory Sociology)

–       What is Sociology

–       Key concepts (norms, values and culture)

–       Socialisation (primary and secondary)

–       Social Control (formal and informal)

–       Conflict and Consensus

Autumn 2 Studying Society (Research Methods)

–       The Research Process

–       Selecting a sample

–       Primary Research Methods (questionnaires, interviews and observations)

–       Secondary research Methods (official statistics, qualitative data)

–       Ethical issues in research

–       Sociology, social policies and social problems

Spring 1 Families

–       What is a family?

–       Different types of households and families

–       Changing family structures

–       Functionalist approach to families

–       New Right approach to families

–       Marxist approach to families

–       Feminist approach to families

Spring 2 Families

–       Changing gender roles in the family

–       Symmetrical family (Young and Willmott) and role of fathers

–       Power distribution between partners

–       Relationship between parents, children and grandparents

–       Trends in families and households

–       Arranged and forced marriages

–       Alternatives to the family

–       Current family related issues and concerns

Summer 1 Education

–       Roles of education (economic, selective, socialisation, social control and political)

–       Formal and informal education

–       Historical changes in the education system and the comprehensive system

–       Organisation of education in contemporary Britain

–       Independent and private schooling

–       Vocational education

–       School league tables

–       Education policy since 1997

Summer 2 Education

–       Factors affecting educational achievement (social class, material, parental attitudes and school)

–       Streaming, subcultures and school organisation

–       Female achievement and gender specific subjects

–       Ethnicity and achievement

–       Discrimination and lack of black teachers

11 Autumn 1 Crime and Deviance

–       What is crime and deviance?

–       When is an act deviant?

–       Formal and informal rules

–       Social control (formal and informal)

–       Explanations for criminal behaviour (non-sociological and sociological)

–       Labelling theory for criminal and deviant behaviour

–       Official statistics on crime

 

 

Autumn 2 Crime and Deviance

–       Factors affecting criminal behaviour (age, gender, ethnicity, social class and locality)

–       Victims of crime, communities and society

–       Youth crime

–       Racism and crime

 

The Mass Media

–       How news in presented

–       Black people represented in the media and gender represented in the media

–       Internet and democracy

–       Deviancy amplification

–       Contemporary social issues and the mass media

 

 

 

Spring 1 The Mass Media

–       What are the mass media?

–       Broadcast and electronic media and the technological developments

–       Newspaper readership, television audiences, use of the internet

–       Effects of the mass media on their audience (hypodermic syringe, uses ad gratification and the decoding approach)

–       Media and socialisation (including political)

–       Press ownership, pluralist and conflict approaches

 

Social Inequality

–       What is social inequality?

–       Life chances

–       Forms of stratification

–       Explanations of social class (Marx, Weber and Functionalists)

–       Measuring social class

 

Spring 2 Social Inequality

 

–       Gender and inequalities

–       Ethnicity and inequalities

–       Age (youth and older ages)

–       Distribution of wealth and income

–       Social mobility

–       What is poverty and how is it measured?

–       Who experiences poverty?

–       Explanations of poverty

–       Social class, does it matter and what are the views about it?

 

 

YEAR 10 Foundation: 2017-18
 
Term Week YEAR 10: 2017-18 Topic break-down (sub-topics)
Autumn 1 1 Basic Number 1.1 Place value and ordering numbers 1.3 The four rules 1.2 Order of operations and BIDMAS
2 Baseline testing
3 Measures and scale drawings 2.1 Systems of measurement 2.2 Conversion factors 2.3 Scale drawings 2.4 Nets 2.5 Using an isometric grid
4 Charts, tables and averages 3.1 Frequency tables 3.2 Statistical diagrams
5 Charts, tables and averages 3.3 Line graphs 3.4 Statistical averages
6 ASSESSMENT WEEK
7 RE-TEACH
Half term – two weeks
Autumn 2 1 Angles 4.1 Angles facts 4.2 Triangles 4.3 Angles in a polygon 4.4 Regular polygons
2 Angles 4.5 Angles in parallel lines 4.6 Special quadrilaterals 4.7 Bearings
3 Number properties 5.1 Multiples of whole numbers 5.2 Factors of whole numbers 5.3 Prime numbers 5.4 Prime factors, LCM and HCF
4 Number properties 5.5 Square numbers 5.6 Square roots 5.7 Basic calculations on a calculator
5 Approximations 6.1 Rounding whole numbers 6.2 Rounding decimals 6.3 Approximating calculations
6 ASSESSMENT WEEK
7 RE-TEACH
End of term – two weeks
Spring 1 1 Decimals and fractions 7.1 Calculating with decimals 7.2 Fractions and reciprocals 7.3 Writing one quantity as a fraction of another
2 Decimals and fractions 7.4 Adding and subtracting fractions 7.5 Multiplying and dividing fractions 7.6 Fractions on a calculator
3 Linear graphs 8.1 Graphs and equations 8.2 Drawing linear graphs by finding points 8.3 Gradient of a line
4 Linear graphs 8.4 y = mx + c 8.5 Finding the equation of a line from its graph 8.6 The equation of a parallel line
5 ASSESSMENT WEEK
6 RE-TEACH
Half term – one week
Spring 2 1 Expressions and formulae 9.1 Basic algebra 9.2 Substitution 9.3 Expanding brackets 9.4 Factorisation
2 Expressions and formulae 9.5 Quadratic expansion 9.6 Quadratic factorisation 9.7 Changing the subject of a formula
3 Ratio, speed and proportion 10.1 Ratio 10.2 Speed, distance and time
4 Ratio, speed and proportion 10.3 Direct proportion problems 10.4 Best buys
5 Perimeter and area 11.1 Rectangles 11.2 Compound shapes
End of term – two weeks
Summer 1 1 Perimeter and area 11.3 Area of a triangle 11.4 Area of a parallelogram
2 Perimeter and area 11.5 Area of a trapezium 11.6 Circles 11.7 The area of a circle 11.8 Answers in terms of π
3 Transformations 12.1 Rotational symmetry 12.2 Translation 12.3 Reflections 12.4 Rotations
4 Transformations 12.5 Enlargements 12.6 Using more than one transformation 12.7 Vectors
5 ASSESSMENT WEEK
6 RE-TEACH
Half term – one week
Summer 2 1 Probability and events 13.1 Calculating probabilities 13.2 Probability that an outcome will not happen 13.3 Mutually exclusive and exhaustive outcomes
2 Probability and events 13.4 Experimental probability 13.5 Expectation 13.6 Choices and outcomes
3 Volumes and surface areas of prisms 14.1 3D shapes 14.2 Volume and surface area of a cuboid Summer examinations and revision 14.3 Volume and surface area of a prism 14.4 Volume and surface area of cylinders
4 Linear equations 15.1 Solving linear equations 15.2 Solving equations with brackets
5 Linear equations 15.3 Solving equations with the variable on both sides
6 ASSESSMENT WEEK
7 RE-TEACH
YEAR 10 HIGHER : 2017-18
 
Term Week YEAR 10: 2017-18 Topic break-down (sub-topics)
Autumn 1 1 Basic Number 1.1 Solving real-life problems 1.2 Multiplication and division with decimals
2 Baseline testing
3 Basic Number 1.3 Approximation of calculations 1.4 Multiples, factors, prime numbers, powers and roots
4 Fractions, ratios and proportions 2.1 One quantity as a fraction of another 2.2 Adding, subtracting and calculating with fractions 2.3 Multiplying and dividing fractions
5 Fractions, ratios and proportions 2.4 Fractions on a calculator 2.5 Increasing and decreasing quantities by a percentage 2.6 Expressing one quantity as a percentage of another
6 ASSESSMENT WEEK
7 RE-TEACH
Half term – two weeks
Autumn 2 1 Statistical diagrams and averages 3.1 Statistical representation 3.2 Statistical measures 3.3 Scatter diagrams
2 Number and sequences 4.1 Patterns in number 4.2 Number sequences 4.3 Finding the nth term of a linear sequence 4.4 Special sequences
3 Number and sequences 4.5 General rules from given patterns 4.6 The nth term of a quadratic sequence 4.7 Finding the nth term for quadratic sequences
4 Ratio and proportion 5.1 Ratio 5.2 Direct proportion problems 5.3 Best buys
5 Ratio and proportion 5.4 Compound measures 5.5 Compound interest and repeated percentage change 5.6 Reverse percentage (working out the original amount)
6 ASSESSMENT WEEK
7 RE-TEACH
End of term – two weeks
Spring 1 1 Angles 6.1 Angle facts 6.2 Triangles 6.3 Angles in a polygon 6.4 Regular polygons
2 Angles 6.5 Angles in parallel lines 6.6 Special quadrilaterals 6.7 Scale drawings and bearings
3 Transformations, constructions and loci 7.1 Congruent triangles 7.2 Rotational symmetry 7.3 Transformations 7.4 Combinations of transformations
4 Transformations, constructions and loci 7.5 Bisectors 7.6 Defining a locus 7.7 Loci problems 7.8 Plans and elevations
5 ASSESSMENT WEEK
6 RE-TEACH
Half term – one week
Spring 2 1 Algebraic manipulation 8.1 Basic algebra 8.2 Factorisation 8.3 Quadratic expansion 8.4 Expanding squares
2 Algebraic manipulation 8.5 More than two binomials 8.6 Quadratic factorisation 8.7 Factorising ax2 + bx + c 8.8 Changing the subject of a formula
3 Length, area and Volume 9.1 Circumference and area of a circle 9.2 Area of a parallelogram 9.3 Area of a trapezium 9.4 Sectors 9.5 Volume of a prism
4 Length, area and Volume 9.6 Cylinders 9.7 Volume of a pyramid
5 Length, area and Volume 9.8 Cones 9.9 Spheres
End of term – two weeks
Summer 1 1 Linear graphs 10.1 Drawing linear graphs from points 10.2 Gradient of a line 10.3 Drawing graphs by gradient-intercept and cover-up methods
2 Linear graphs 10.4 Finding the equation of a line from its graph 10.5 Real-life uses for graphs 10.6 Solving simultaneous equations using graphs
3 Right-angled triangles 11.1 Pythagoras’ theorem 11.2 Finding the length of the shorter side 11.3 Applying Pythagoras’ theorem in real-life situations 11.4 Pythagoras’ theorem and isosceles triangles 11.5 Pythagoras’ theorem in three dimensions 11.6 Trigonometric ratios
4 Right-angled triangles 11.7 Calculating angles 11.8 Using the sine and cosine functions 11.9 Using the tangent function 11.10 Which ratio to use 11.11 Solving problems using trigonometry 11.12 Trigonometry and bearings 11.13 Trigonometry and isosceles triangles
5 ASSESSMENT WEEK
6 RE-TEACH
Half term – one week
Summer 2 1 Similarity 12.1 Similar triangles 12.2 Areas and volumes of similar shapes
2 Exploring and applying probability 13.1 Experimental probability 13.2 Mutually exclusive events and exhaustive outcomes 13.3 Expectation
3 Exploring and applying probability 13.4 Probability and two-way tables 13.5 Probability and Venn diagrams
4 Powers and standard form 14.1 Powers (indices) 14.2 Rules for multiplying and dividing powers
5 Powers and standard form 14.3 Standard form
6 ASSESSMENT WEEK
7 RE-TEACH

 

YEAR 11 Foundation: 2017-18
 
Term Week YEAR 11: 2017-18 Topic break-down (sub-topics)
Autumn 1 1 Linear graphs 8.1 Graphs and equations 8.2 Drawing linear graphs by finding points 8.3 Gradient of a line 8.4 y = mx + c
2 Linear graphs 8.5 Finding the equation of a line from its graph 8.6 The equation of a parallel line 8.7 Real-life uses of graphs 8.8 Solving simultaneous equations using graphs
3 Ratio, speed and proportion 10.1 Ratio 10.2 Speed, distance and time
4 Ratio, speed and proportion 10.3 Direct proportion problems 10.4 Best buys
5 Volume and surface area of a prism 14.1 3D shapes 14.2 Volume and surface area of a cuboid 14.3 Volume and surface area of a prism 14.4 Volume and surface area of cylinders
6 ASSESSMENT WEEK
7 RE-TEACH
Half term – two weeks
Autumn 2 1 Linear equations 15.1 Solving linear equations 15.2 Solving equations with brackets
2 Linear equations 15.3 Solving equations with the variable on both sides 15.4 Solving equations with the variable on both sides with brackets
3 Probability and events 13.1 Calculating probabilities 13.2 Probability that an outcome will not happen 13.3 Mutually exclusive and exhaustive outcomes
4 Probability and events 13.4 Experimental probability 13.5 Expectation 13.6 Choices and outcomes
5 Revision
6 MOCK EXAMs
7 Reducing the REDs
End of term – two weeks
Spring 1 1 Percentages and compound measures 16.1 Equivalent percentages, fractions and decimals 16.2 Calculating a percentage of a quantity 16.3 Increasing and decreasing quantities by a percentage 16.4 Expressing one quantity as a percentage of another 16.5 Compound measures
2 Percentages and compound measures 17.1 Compound interest and repeated percentage change 17.2 Reverse percentage (working out the original value) 17.3 Direct proportion 17.4 Inverse proportion
3 Congruency and similarity 23.1 Congruent triangles 23.2 Similarity
4 Probability: Combined events 24.1 Combined events 24.2 Two-way tables 24.3 Probability and Venn diagrams 24.2 Tree diagrams
5 Powers and standard form 25.1 Powers (indices) 25.2 Rules for multiplying and dividing powers 25.3 Standard form
6 Revision
Half term – one week
Spring 2 1 MOCK EXAMs
2 Simultaneous equations 26.1 Elimination method for simultaneous equations 26.2 Substitution method for simultaneous equations 26.3 Balancing coefficients to solve simultaneous equations 26.4 Using simultaneous equations to solve problems 26.5 Linear inequalities
3 Algebra: Non-linear graphs 27.1 Distance-time graphs 27.2 Velocity-time graphs 27.3 Plotting quadratic graphs 27.4 Solving quadratic equations by factorisation 27.5 The significant points of a quadratic curve 27.6 Cubic and reciprocal graphs
4 REVISION
5 REVISION
End of term – two weeks
Summer 1 1 REVISION
2 REVISION
3 REVISION
4 REVISION
5 REVISION
6 EXAM
Half term – one week
Summer 2 1 EXAM
2 EXAM

 

 

YEAR 11 HIGHER: 2017-18
 
Term Week YEAR 11: 2017-18 Topic break-down (sub-topics)
Autumn 1 1 Averages from Tables / Scatter diagrams 3.1 Statistical representation 3.2 Statistical measures 3.3 Scatter diagrams
2 Similarity /: Powers and standard form 12.1 Similar triangles 12.2 Areas and volumes of similar shapes 14.1 Powers (indices) 14.2 Rules for multiplying and dividing powers 14.3 Standard form
3 Exploring and applying probability 13.1 Experimental probability 13.2 Mutually exclusive events and exhaustive outcomes 13.3 Expectation 13.4 Probability and two-way tables 13.5 Probability and Venn diagrams
4 Equations and inequalities 15.1 Linear equations 15.2 Elimination method for simultaneous equations
5 Equations and inequalities 15.3 Substitution method for simultaneous equations 15.4 Balancing coefficients to solve simultaneous equations 15.5 Using simultaneous equations to solve problems
6 ASSESSMENT WEEK
7 RE-TEACH
Half term – two weeks
Autumn 2 1 Counting, accuracy, powers and surds 16.1 Rational numbers, reciprocals, terminating and recurring decimals 16.2 Estimating powers and roots 16.3 Negative and fractional powers 16.4 Surds
2 Counting, accuracy, powers and surds 16.5 Limits of accuracy 16.6 Problems involving limits of accuracy 16.7 Choices and outcomes
3 Quadratic equations 17.1 Plotting quadratic graphs 17.2 Solving quadratic equations by factorisation 17.3 Solving a quadratic equation by using the quadratic formula 17.4 Solving quadratic equations by completing the square 17.5 The significant points of a quadratic curve
4 Quadratic equations 17.6 Solving one linear and one non-linear equation using graphs 17.7 Solving quadratic equations by the method of intersection 17.8 Solving linear and non-linear simultaneous equations algebraically 17.9 Quadratic inequalities
5 Vectors 25.1 Properties of vectors 25.2 Vectors in geometry
6 MOCK EXAMs
7 Reducing the REDs
End of term – two weeks
Spring 1 1 Sampling and more complex diagrams 18.1 Collecting data 18.2 Frequency polygons 18.3 Cumulative frequency graphs 18.4 Box plots 18.5 Histograms
2 Combined events 19.1 Addition rules for outcomes of events 19.2 Combined events 19.3 Tree diagrams 19.4 Independent events 19.5 Conditional probability
3 Properties of circles 20.1 Circle theorems 20.2 Cyclic quadrilaterals 20.3 Tangents and chords 20.4 Alternate segment theorem
4 Variation 21.1 Direct proportion 21.2 Inverse proportion
5 Triangles 22.1 Further 2D problems 22.2 Further 3D problems 22.3 Trigonometric ratios of angles between 0° and 360° 22.4 Solving any triangle 22.5 Using sine to find the area of any triangle
6 Revision
Half term – one week
Spring 2 1 MOCK EXAMs
2 Graphs 23.7 Transformation of the graph y = f(x)
3 Algebraic fractions and functions 24.1 Algebraic fractions 24.2 Changing the subject of a formula 24.3 Functions 24.4 Composite functions 24.5 Iteration
4 REVISION
5 REVISION
End of term – two weeks
Summer 1 1 REVISION
2 REVISION
3 REVISION
4 REVISION
5 REVISION
6 EXAM
Half term – one week
Summer 2 1 EXAM
2 EXAM

 

 

A-level Science 2017-2018

  Exam board
  Course Biology A (Salters-Nuffield) 2015 Chemistry (2015) Physics (2015)
    Biology Chemistry Physics
12 Autumn 1 Topic 1: Lifestyle, Health and Risk Topic 1: Atomic Structure & Periodic table

Topic 2: Structure & bonding

Topic 3: Waves

Topic 4: Mechanics and Materials

Autumn 2 Topic 1: Lifestyle, Health and Risk Topic 3: Redox I

Topic 5: Formulae, equations, and amount of substance pt1.

Topic 3: Waves

Topic 4: Mechanics and Materials

Spring 1 Topic 2: Genes and Health Topic 4: Inorganic chemistry

Topic 5: Formulae, equations, and amount of substance pt2

Topic 2: Particles & Radiation

Topic 5: Electricity

Spring 2 Topic 3: Voice of the Genome Topic 6: Organic Chemistry I

Topic 7: Analytical techniques I

Topic 2: Particles & Radiation

Topic 5: Electricity

Summer 1 Topic 3: Voice of the Genome

Topic 4: Biodiversity and Natural Resources

Topic 8: Energetics I

Topic 9: Kinetics I

Topic 6.1: Further Mechanics

 

Summer 2 Topic 4: Biodiversity and Natural Resources

End of year assessment

Topic 10: Equilibrium I

 

End of year assessment

Topic 6.2: Thermal Physics

Topic 7: Fields

End of year assessment

Year Group Term Topic and Content
Biology Chemistry Physics
13 Autumn 1 Topic 5: On the Wild Side Topic 11: Equilibrium II

Topic 12: Acid Base Equilibria

Topic 6.2: Thermal Physics

Topic 7: Fields

Autumn 2 Topic 6: Immunity, Infection and Forensics. Topic 13: Energetics II

Topic 14: Redox II

Topic 7: Fields

Topic 8: Nuclear Physics

Spring 1 Topic 7: Run for your Life Topic 15: Transition metals

Topic 16: Kinetics

Topic 17: Organic chemistry II

Topic 8: Nuclear Physics

Option: Medical or Astrophysics

Spring 2 Topic 8: Grey Matter Topic 18: Organic Chemistry III

Topic 19: Analytical Techniques II

Topic 8: Nuclear Physics

Option: Medical or Astrophysics

Summer 1 Revision and exam preparation

 

GCSE Combined science 2017-2018

Year Group Term Topic and Content
Biology Chemistry Physics
10 Autumn 1 Cell biology.

–     Cell structure & specialisation

–      Microscopy

–      Cell division

–      Cell transport

 

Atomic structure & the periodic table.

–       Atoms, elements & compounds

–       Size and mass of atoms

–       Development of the periodic table

 

Atomic Structure

–       Atoms and isotopes

–       Development of the atomic model

–       Radioactivity

Autumn 2 Organisation.

–       Tissues, organs & organ systems

–       The digestive system

–       The cardiovascular system

Bonding, structure & properties of matter.

–       Ionic, covalent and metallic bonds

–       How bonding influences properties

–       Carbon chemistry.

 

Particle model of matter

–       Density and pressure

–       Changes of state

–       Energy transfers

 

Spring 1 Organisation.

–       Coronary disease & cancer

–       Plant systems

Organic Chemistry

–       Hydrocarbons

–       Fractional distillation

–       Alkenes

–       Cracking

 

Energy

–       Energy stores

–       Changes in energy systems

Spring 2 Infection & response.

–     Communicable diseases

–     Human defence systems

–     Medicines & vaccination

Chemical Analysis

–       Pure substances & formulations

–       Chromatography

–       Identifying common gases

 

Energy

–       Conservation of energy

–       Energy resources

Summer 1 Bioenergetics.

–       Photosynthesis

–       Respiration

–       Metabolism

Chemistry of the atmosphere

–       The Earths’ early atmosphere

–       Greenhouse gases & climate change

–       Atmospheric pollutants

 

Electricity

–       Electrical circuits

–       Current, resistance & potential difference

–       Series & parallel circuits

Summer 2 Ecology

–       Communities & adaptations

–       Organisation of an ecosystem

–       Biodiversity & human impact

Using Earth’s resources

–       Water

–       Life cycle assessment & recycling

–       Reducing waste

 

 

Electricity

–       Power

–       Domestic and mains electricity

–       The national grid

 

Year Group Term Topic and Content
Biology Chemistry Physics
11 Autumn 1 Homeostasis & response

–       What is homeostasis?

–       Human nervous system

–       Human endocrine system

–       Controlling blood glucose levels

–       Hormones in reproduction & contraception

–       Treating infertility

 

Quantitative chemistry.

–       Conservation of mass

–       Calculating amounts of substances

–       Concentrations of solutions.

Chemical changes.

–       Reactivity of metals

–       Reactions of acids

Electrolysis

Waves

–       Wave properties

–       Electromagnetic waves

–       Light waves

Autumn 2 Inheritance, variation & evolution

–       Sexual and asexual reproduction

–       Genetic inheritance and genetic disorders

–       Selective breeding

–       Genetic engineering

 

Energy changes.

–       Endothermic and exothermic reactions

–       Energy changes in chemical reactions

Magnetism & electromagnetism

–       Magnetic fields

–       Electromagnetism

–       Electric motors

Spring 1 Inheritance, variation & evolution

–       Evidence for evolution

–       Resistant bacteria

–       Classification of living organisms

 

Rate & extent of chemical change

–       Rate of chemical reactions

–       Reversible reactions

Chemical equilibrium

Forces

–       Interactions of forces

–       Work done & energy transfer

–       Forces & motion

–       Momentum

Spring 2 Revision programme and mock exams. Key skills for science exams including literacy and numeracy strategies.

 

Revision programme and mock exams. Key skills for science exams including literacy and numeracy strategies. Revision programme and mock exams. Key skills for science exams including literacy and numeracy strategies.

 

 

 

GCSE Separate Sciences 2017-2018

Year Group Term Topic and Content (bold content is specific to this course)
Biology Chemistry Physics
10 Autumn 1 Cell biology.

–     Cell structure & specialisation

–      Microscopy

–      Cell division

–      Cell transport

 

Atomic structure & the periodic table.

–       Atoms, elements & compounds

–       Ions and isotopes

–       Size and mass of atoms

–       Development of the periodic table

Atomic Structure

–       Atoms and isotopes

–       Development of the atomic model

–       Radioactivity

–       Nuclear fission, fusion, and uses in medicine.

Autumn 2 Organisation.

–       Tissues, organs & organ systems

–       The digestive system

–       The cardiovascular system

Bonding, structure & properties of matter.

–       Ionic, covalent and metallic bonds

–       How bonding influences properties

–       Carbon chemistry.

–       Nanotechnology

Particle model of matter

–       Density and pressure

–       Changes of state

–       Energy transfers

–       Gas pressure & volume.

Spring 1 Organisation.

–       Coronary disease & cancer

–       Plant systems

Organic Chemistry

–       Hydrocarbons

–       Fractional distillation

–       Alkenes and cracking

–       Organic reactions and products

Energy

–       Energy stores

–       Changes in energy systems

 

Spring 2 Infection & response.

–     Communicable diseases

–     Human defence systems

–     Medicines & vaccination

–     Growing and controlling bacteria

–     Plant disease and defences

–     Monoclonal antibodies

Chemical Analysis

–       Pure substances & formulations

–       Chromatography

–       Testing for ions

Energy

–       Conservation of energy

–       Energy resources

–       Infrared radiation

–       Energy issues/

Summer 1 Bioenergetics.

–       Photosynthesis/respiration

–       Metabolism & homeostasis

Chemistry of the atmosphere

–       The Earths’ early atmosphere

–       Greenhouse gases & climate change

–       Atmospheric pollutants

Electricity

–       Electrical circuits

–       Current, resistance & potential difference

–       Series & parallel circuits

Summer 2 Ecology

–       Communities & adaptations

–       Organisation of an ecosystem

–       Biodiversity & human impact

–       Decomposition.

–       Food production & sustainability.

Using Earth’s resources

–       Water

–       Life cycle assessment & recycling

–       Reducing waste

–       Use of Earth’s resources

 

Electricity

–       Power

–       Domestic and mains electricity

–       The national grid

 

     
     
     
     
Year Group Term Topic and Content
Biology Chemistry Physics
11 Autumn 1 Homeostasis & response

–       What is homeostasis?

–       Human nervous system

–       Human endocrine system

–       Controlling blood glucose levels

–       Hormones in reproduction & contraception

–       Treating infertility

–       The brain, eyes and kidneys.

–       Plant hormones

Quantitative chemistry.

–       Conservation of mass

–       Calculating amounts of substances

–       Concentrations of solutions.

–       Chemical yields.

–       Titrations.

Chemical changes.

–       Reactivity of metals

–       Reactions of acids

Electrolysis

Waves

–       Wave properties

–       Electromagnetic waves

–       Light waves

–       Sound waves

–       Refraction

–       Light and Colour

–       Lenses

Autumn 2 Inheritance, variation & evolution

–       Sexual and asexual reproduction

–       Genetic inheritance and genetic disorders

–       Selective breeding

–       Genetic engineering & cloning.

–       DNA structure, protein synthesis

–       Genetic mutations.

 

 

Energy changes.

–       Endothermic and exothermic reactions

–       Energy changes in chemical reactions

–       Chemical cells, fuel cells & batteries

Magnetism & electromagnetism

–       Magnetic fields

–       Electromagnetism

–       Electric motors

–       Use of electromagnets

–       Generators and transformers.

 

Space Physics (GCSE PHYSICS ONLY)

 

Spring 1 Inheritance, variation & evolution

–       Evidence for evolution

–       The history of evolution & associated theories.

–       Resistant bacteria

–       Classification of living organisms

 

Rate & extent of chemical change

–       Rate of chemical reactions

–       Reversible reactions

Chemical equilibrium

Forces

–       Interactions of forces

–       Work done & energy transfer

–       Forces & motion

–       Momentum

Spring 2 Revision programme and mock exams. Key skills for science exams including literacy and numeracy strategies.

 

Revision programme and mock exams. Key skills for science exams including literacy and numeracy strategies. Revision programme and mock exams. Key skills for science exams including literacy and numeracy strategies.

 

 

Year 13

At HFUTC Key Stage 5 students will follow and be entered for Health and Social Care. Currently students are following the BTEC Technical Certificate, Diploma or Extended Diploma in Health and Social Care, OCR Cambridge Technical’ s

There are both externally set examinations and controlled assessments as well as internally set assignments on both of these courses.

Autumn Term Spring term Summer Term
Year 13 Safeguarding

·         Types and signs of abuse

·         Factors leading to abusive situations

·         Legislation and guidance for safeguarding

·         How to deal with suspected abuse and disclosures

·         Strategies and procedures for safeguarding

·         Minimising the risk of abuse

 

Promote Positive Behaviour

·         Promote positive behaviour in HSC settings

·         Restrictive interventions

·         Use of interventions

·         Legislation and guidance related to positive behaviour

 

Promoting health and wellbeing

·         Healthy Lifestyle

·         Strategies and the role of professionals

·         Factors influencing promotion of health and wellbeing

·         Implement and evaluate a campaign promoting health and wellbeing

 

Impact of Physiological conditions (Extended Diploma)

·         Physiological conditions

·         Long term effects of physiological conditions

·         End of life care

Nutrition for Health

·         Nutritional guidelines

·         Functions of nutrients

·         Factors influencing health

·         Recommendations for improving nutritional health

 

Sexual Health, Reproduction and early development stages

·         Sexual health and contraception

·         Pre-natal health and process of conception

·         Factors affecting healthy pregnancies and birth

·         Stages of pregnancy, birth and postnatal care

·         Care and development of a baby in their first year of life

 

Supporting people with dementia (Extended Diploma)

·         Types of dementia

·         Legislation and frameworks

·         Supporting individuals with dementia

Supporting people with mental health conditions (Extended Diploma)

·         Main types, concepts, causes and effects of mental health

·         Support individuals with mental health conditions

Examination Period

 

Within HSC students are assessed regularly in line with HFUTC assessment and data policies and all assessments are graded for Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar.

 

Year 10 and 11

At HFUTC all Key Stage 4 students will follow and be entered for a full course GCSE in Health and Social Care. Currently students are following the BTEC Tech Award in Health and Social Care, Edexcel. This is divided into three core areas of study:

  • Component 1: Human Lifespan Development
  • Component 2: Health and Social Care Values
  • Component 3: Health and Wellbeing

The first two components are internally set and marked with the final component being set by the board as a controlled assessment. These components are graded L1P which is the equivalent to a grade D, L2P a grade C, L2M a grade B and L2D a grade A.

Autumn Term Spring term Summer Term
Year 10 Human Lifespan Development

·         Life Stages

·         PIES

·         Factors affecting life stages and the health and well-being of individuals

Human Lifespan Development

·         Life events that can affect individuals

Health and Social Care Values

·         Services in health and social care

·         Barriers affecting access to health and social care services

Health and Social Care Values

·         Demonstrating health and social care values

Health and Wellbeing

·         Factors affecting health and wellbeing

 

Year 11 Health and Wellbeing

·         Health indicators

·         Lifestyle indicators

·         Health and wellbeing improvement plans

Students will be able to attempt the controlled assessment in January of year 11 Examination Period – Students can re-sit component 3 in May

Within HSC students are assessed regularly in line with HFUTC assessment and data policies and all assessments are graded for Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar.

Year 11

At HFUTC all current Year 11 students will follow and be entered for a full course GCSE in Health and Social Care. Currently students are following the BTEC First Award in Health and Social Care, Edexcel. This is divided into four core areas of study:

  • Unit 1: Human Lifespan Development
  • Unit 2: Health and Social Care Values
  • Unit 3: Effective Communication in Health and Social Care
  • Unit 4: Social Influences in Health and Social Care
Autumn Term Spring term Summer Term
Year 11 Social Influences

·         Relationships

·         Primary and secondary socialisation

·         Social Factors

Human Lifespan Development

·         Life stages

·         PIES in each life stage

·         Factors affecting the development of the PIES

·         Life events

·         Types of support available

Examination Period

Within HSC students are assessed regularly in line with HFUTC assessment and data policies and all assessments are graded for Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar.

PE and extra-curricular activities

Students at Health Futures UTC participate in core PE once a week for two 50 minute sessions. The curriculum enables learners to participate in a range of activities both onsite and offsite at our local leisure centre.  The PE department offers an extra curricular club on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings after school, the activities for these rotate during seasons.

We aim to provide our students with as much opportunity as possible to compete in competitions if they are keen to do so. We compete in the Sandwell school tournaments and leagues, we currently have a girls netball team in year 10, a boys handball team in year 10, and a girls rounder’s team in year 10, which have all performed well!

 

Health Futures Sixth Form offers a wide range of activities designed to enrich students’ lives, improve their confidence and self-esteem and build their skills portfolio. We believe that all students should take advantage of as many as they can at Post-16 level. These activities enable our students to apply successfully for university, further education, apprenticeships and jobs in a wide range of careers.

Post-16 non-qualification activities at Health Futures UTC include:

  • Work experience
  • Voluntary work
  • Involvement in local community projects
  • Taking an active role in fund raising
  • Working with younger students as mentors and peer guides
  • Senior Student Leadership roles
  • Health and Wellbeing enrichment days
  • Technical Challenge Projects with Partners

Post 16 students regularly attend off-site events, such as:

  • UCAS Higher Education Convention
  • University open days
  • Careers fairs